Nago man donates clothing to Cambodia despite rare disorder

Nago man donates clothing to Cambodia despite rare disorder

Accompanied by his supporter Taeko Somanosho, Tsubasa Ishikawa (left) received a certificate of appreciation from a nongovernmental organization in Cambodia. At the Northern Region Office of the Ryuyku Shimpo on September 13.


September 18, 2013 Ryukyu Shimpo

Despite struggling with a rare inherited muscle disorder known as hypokalemic periodic paralysis, Nago resident Tsubasa Ishikawa does volunteer work sending clothing to children in Cambodia. Ishikawa received a certificate of appreciation from a Cambodian nongovernmental organization.

Starting his volunteer work this spring, by August Ishikawa had sent more than 800 kilograms of clothing to Cambodia. He plans to continue his grassroots level international contribution, saying, “I am grateful to the individuals, corporations and organizations that have supported me along the way.”

Ishikawa began sending clothing to Cambodia after hearing that one of his friends had done similar volunteer work.

Although the disease he suffers from can abruptly paralyze the arms and legs, Ishikawa has not had any turns while carrying out his activities.

As well as calling for support from his friends, Ishikawa promoted the project through newspaper advertisements and personal communication. Besides individuals, Okinawa associations outside the prefecture and the country, corporations and organizations in Okinawa have provided clothing for Ishikawa’s project. Ishikawa paid the freight cost himself.

Ishikawa received a certificate of appreciation on August 27 from the Khmer Love Khmer Federation, the nongovernmental organization in Cambodia that accepted the clothing. The organization works on agricultural and study support projects in deprived areas of the country.

Ishikawa started his project after finding out that Cambodian children in poverty have no clothes to wear. He said, “I want to continue doing what I can to help these children.”

(English translation by T&CT, Mark Ealey)

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