Okinawa International Peace Research Institute renews exhibition on the Battle of Okinawa

Okinawa International Peace Research Institute renews exhibition on the Battle of Okinawa

On June 19, Former Governor Masahide Ota showed a guide map for touring the battle sites at the exhibition hall of the Okinawa International Peace Research Institute in Naha.


July 1, 2014 Ryukyu Shimpo

The Okinawa International Peace Research Institute renewed its Battle of Okinawa exhibition on June 19. It displays 755 photographs which Masahide Ota, the president of the Institute and former Okinawa Governor, collected from the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration at the exhibition hall in Naha City. These photographs are showcased with English and Japanese description in chronological order from the night before the Battle of Okinawa to the early reconstruction period when the United States built military bases in Okinawa .

The Institute has also created an A2 size battle site map of Naha, with a description and photograph. This map can be purchased for 500 yen. It plans to publish a series of guide maps for touring the battle sites in all 41 cities, towns and villages.

Former Governor Ota who was drafted into the Japanese Imperial Army as a member of Tekketsu Kinnoutai (the Blood and Iron Student corps) said, “We can learn an important lesson from the Battle of Okinawa by looking at those photographs. I want many local children to visit the exhibition in the institution, which is walking distance from the Naha Bus Terminal.”

Admission fee for adults is 500 yen, 300 yen for junior and high school students, and free for elementary school students and infants. The exhibition hall will open from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. It is closed on Thursday. For more details, please call the Institute on 098 (979) 9490.

(English translation by T&CT, Hitomi Shinzato)

On June 19, Former Governor Masahide Ota showed a guide map for touring the battle sites at the exhibition hall of the Okinawa International Peace Research Institute in Naha.


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