Shipping volume of kariyushi shirts expected to exceed 400,000 items in 2013

Shipping volume of kariyushi shirts expected to exceed 400,000 items in 2013

Nichihan Textile, a subsidiary of Nishin Shokai, plans to increase production of kariyushi shirts for fiscal 2014. In Itoman on November 18.


November 19, 2013 Ryukyu Shimpo

The kariyushi shirt market remains strong. According to the Okinawa Clothing Sewing and Manufacturing Industrial Association, the shipping volume of these shirts from January to October totaled 398,413 items, which breaks the record of 385,965 set in 2012. Shipping volume in 2013 is expected to exceed 400,000 items for the first time.

The kariyushi shirt market in Okinawa has become saturated because of their increased use in various workplaces, but expanding the market outside the prefecture has been a success.

According to the association, the shipping volume was more than 300,000 items in 2004, but that declined in 2007, and decreased to about 268,000 in 2009. However, it recovered to over 300,000 and hit a record high in 2012.

Sewing company Nishin Shokai saw its production of kariyushi shirts increase by 20 percent over the previous period. The company continues its sales of the shirts in Okinawa, but has also succeeded in selling the product to companies outside the prefecture, such as department stores and banks. It plans to increase production for fiscal 2014 from July by 20 percent.

Big companies in Japan used the shirts for Cool Biz summer outfit this year, with the extreme heat contributing to the increased demand for the shirts. Manufacturers have also improved sewing techniques and met demand for a range of designs, which led to the increase in the shipping volume.

The president of Nishin Shokai, Hideyuki Oshiro, said, “I think that our company has worked on various projects such as creating long-sleeved shirts and a range of designs, and this has helped to boost production.” He continued, “We need to continue expanding markets outside Okinawa next season.”

(English translation by T&CT, Mark Ealey)

Go to Japanese

Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Tweet about this on Twitter0
 


Previous Article:
Next Article:

[Similar Articles]